COLES COUNTY NEWS:

THE GATHERERS AND THE REPORTING

Return to the Radio History Table of Contents

SPECIAL SECTIONS:    192 193  194  195  196  197  198  199  200  201  202  203  204  205  206  207  208  209 210

191.

THE CHARLESTON DAILY NEWS

 

CHARLESTON'S RARDIN FAMILY

TRADITION BEGAN IN 1880

 

       James K. Rardin,   an Irish pioneer, began   the Saturday EVENING HERALD in 1880 to provide a third paper for Charleston.  He did not make it financially, and merged with the older CHARLESTON PLAINDEALER.

       The Rardin family is an original Charleston family.   They were staunch Democrats in view, and would express this many times in their newspaper editorials. In 1892, James Rardin tried his hand again at the  newspaper profession.  He started a newspaper called the DAILY NEWS.

        This paper was more financially successful. His son, Claude would be his successor in running it from 1912 till 1923. Disaster would hit and the paper office burned to the ground, with damage amounting to $25,000, and he only had $100.00 insurance coverage.  Claude's nickname was "Caesar".

        The old PLAINDEALER-HERALD was failing financially, so Caesar bought it. Caesar bought the equipment and purchased the title of the dead paper for $1.00. He then added the nameplate DAILY NEWS. 

         The DAILY NEWS was a lively paper, and came out in the morning.   Readers could wake up-with recent headlines and other special items. The paper was shorter than the COURIER and had larger print-type. It was a little easier to read.

         Caesar Rardin was known for sensational headlines and stories.  Some considered the paper too liberal and opinionated.  Maybe it was somewhat similar to modern day tabloids.

       After reading and reviewing several editions, I found that it was not a lot different from the Courier.   It

had a front page of mostly national and state news, with a few local items.   It had a society column, obituaries, specialty articles from the AP wire, and editorials, to which the COURIER did not include.  Arthur Lynch did not editorialize.   

 

 


Return to the Radio History Home Page

Learning On-Line Home Page