Louise (Lynch) Taylor on WEIC

SPECIAL SECTION PART D

Norman Strader, Announcer & Engineer for WEIC

CHARLESTON ILLINOIS'  FIRST COMMERCIAL RADIO STATION WEIC

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179.

PERSONAL MEMORIES OF THE HOWARD TAYLOR & WEIC

THIS AUTHOR WORKED FOR WEIC DURING HIGH SCHOOL YEARS

 

During the mid-1960's I was in high school and started my working career at the Will Rogers and Charleston Drive-In Theaters. My boss then was Charley Beninati, last of the old-time theater managers. The Frisina family of Taylorville owned the Charleston and Mattoon theaters during those days. Personally, I listened to WLS all the time. Being at school most of the time I couldn't hear our mom on WEIC or WLBH (only if she worked weekends), but I had brief employment at WEIC. One job I had was delivering the WEIC newspaper to businesses, hospitals, and other places in Charleston and Mattoon. I can remember delivering the newspaper when the Rardin building fire occurred. Another job I did for Jim Seed and Terry Mack was to sit in the station, pull records and fill in daily logs on "records" they played. I used my new typing skills to do this boring job. Evidently they were supposed to be doing this daily on the hour, but had not done it. I helped to "catch them up". Things got loose at WEIC after Jack Owens left.

ABOUT JACK OWENS

 

If you didn't know Mr. Owens, you missed a very interesting person. He was one-armed because of a train accident. He could shuffle and deal cards at poker very efficiently. In addition he would sometimes come in our house at 408 Madison to visit. Red and I always dreaded these visits because he would stay and stay and stay. He and his wife Betty were good at bringing in outside employees to the station to take over management type work. My mom had problems with some of these characters. I can remember her leaving WEIC on a snowy day, yelling loudly (unmentionables) and getting stuck out on the highway. She didn't put up with much. I can also remember her leaving the downtown WLBH

studio after talking with someone at that station, in a less-than happy method.

 

THE BUSINESS WORLD FOR WOMEN IN THE 1950íS AND 1960íS   

 

During the years of working in the public with radio stations, the State of Illinois, Department of Revenue, and other areas, Louise saw a lot of weird and far-out behavior with men and women. She knew a lot that was going on that shouldn't. I didn't know this, and I'm not sure if my dad knew it, but she was harassed by several prominent men over time. This behavior would be illegal now. When she got her state job, as sales-tax agent, she hated her training at Springfield because of the wildness of the people she had to be around. I worked for the state during the summer of 1966, and heard of the behavior of politicians and big-wigs in the town. Louise handled herself well.

LOUISE BROKE THE ICE FOR WOMEN IN POLITICS IN COLES COUNTY/ SUPPORTS LONGHAIR

 

I have already written of her political activity in the 1950's and later in 1972. She didn't win in either election but did very well. She caused Joseph Snyder to have to campaign hard. She helped to get Mayor Hickman in office. All the time our dad stayed neutral and performed his Fire Department duties perfectly. Red and I led very active lives during high school. Life was always interesting. She likes to tell the story of when Red started playing for the Jesters in 1964 or so. He had slightly long hair (Beatles-style). A teacher at the high school wanted him to cut it or not be in the CHS Spring Concert. He refused. My mom went straight to C.J. Dintleman's office to try to solve the problem. Red felt cutting his hair would hurt his musical career during the following summer. Mr. Dintleman told him to get an inch cut and keep an inch. WOW! such wisdom. Everyone went up to Bennett's Tonsorilium to see the hair cut. Both sides won. Leadership and parental involvement was in its Golden Age with Louise and superintendent C.J. Dintleman in the 60's.

WEIC GOES AUTOMATIC                                  

In about 1960, WEIC went with WLS type programming, but never succeeded.  Its history would fade after its short Golden Age.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

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