Learning Lincoln On-line

FROM-- SET FIVE, CIVIL WAR STUDIES

Topic Sixty-four:  The Navy and Ironclads in the Civil War

TEACHER GUIDE
U.S. Civil War Naval Ships, Men and Battles--Confederate and Union
A Part of My Civil War Weapons & Warfare Activity Page
Click Here to Return or Visit Civil War Weapons Homepage


The turning point of the Civil War Naval War

PART ONE--INTRODUCTION AND CONTENT PAGE OF LINKS

National Ensign

Union Navy Jack

Confederate States National Ensign

Confederate Navy Jack

U.S. Civil War Naval Learning Activity

Using the Ironclad Resource Pages Complete this Study

Pook Turtles, or City Class Ironclad Gunboats

Find Information at Wikipedia  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City-class_ironclad

DIRECTIONS TO USE THE CIVIL WAR NAVAL ACTIVITIES:

Dear Site User,

       There are twelve theme activities in the Naval collection.  These were chosen to allow opportunities to become educated in how the U.S. first modern Navy was organized, and how it was enlarged within four years to be the largest in the world.  There will be parts on technologies and the human element.  As the student of Civil War goes through these you will work within many online resources to find answers and conduct research.  Presentation projects are encouraged such as computer presentations as well as traditional posters.   If a history teacher is using any of these for class, the final product could be any form. 

 IRONCLAD LEARNING ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION

This activity will center on research and information gathering of facts from Internet sources, especially the Learning On-Line Resource Pages.

Answers can be presented in graphic or short-answer format.  Civil War naval battles and officers will also be included in the questions. 

The questions will be written in the form of "orders" from a naval commander to his sailors. 


PART ONE:  THE U.S. NAVY BEFORE THE CIVIL WAR

In order to understand the invention and use of ironclad naval vessels, the learner will study the sail ships, and condition of the U.S. Navy before the Civil War. 

PART TWO: THE IRONCLAD GUNBOATS

In this study, the learner will answer a series of questions about the invention, building and use of the ironclad gunboat, called "Turtlebacks," during the American Civil War.  The Ironclad Resources can be used to find the answers. 

The questions will be written in the form of "orders" from a naval commander to the sailors. 

PART THREE:  "THE RACIAL MELTING POT:" THE U.S. NAVY DURING THE CIVIL WAR

The U.S. Navy even in its' early days did not have a problem with African-Americans serving on the ships.  The Navy could be described as a "racial melting pot."  In this Navy activity, there will be readings about famous blacks such as Robert Smalls and others.  In addition, there will be description of what it was like to serve in the Navy. 

PART FOUR: CIVIL WAR MILITARY "FIRSTS"

The Industrial Revolution was at full steam.  The steam engine was being used in railroad engines and ships.  New weapons were developed including the Spencer Repeater rifle, the first submarines, use of air balloons for surveillance, torpedoes and mines in water, the first hospital ships, new Dahlgren cannons, and the biggest one of all, the ironclad ships.  Wooden ships were instantly made obsolete.  In this Naval activity, you will read about the naval inventions and the inventors and builders.

PART FIVE: FOR SUMTER FALLS, A MAJOR WAR STARTS

After Fort Sumter was lost, President Lincoln and Congress were faced with the idea of a major war.  At first many thought the insurrection would be short-lived, but the new Confederacy was raising a huge army.  General Winfield Scott, head of the Army would come up with the Anaconda Plan to blockade all Southern/Confederate ports to dry up their imports and exports.  A new fleet would be required, and all this led to a Blockade plan (not Scott's Anaconda Plan) was planned and set in-place.  In this activity, you will read about the men and ships involved in the blockade from both sides.

PART SIX: INVINCIBLE BOATS AND CREWS WIN BATTLES

 

Their were many sea and inland river battles that the U.S. Navy was instrumental in helping to win.  In some cases the invincible "Ironclad River Gun Boats" won the battle.  Many sailors and officers won the Medal of Honor.  In this activity, you will learn the names of several battles, the officers and crews of the ships, and the results. 

PART SEVEN: GIDEON WELLES SEC. OF NAVY, U.S.

Abraham Lincoln appointed a Jacksonian Democrat to lead his Navy.  The Navy was going to be instrumental in defending the country, and Lincoln saw that Gideon Welles would be the man for the job.  In this activity you will read about the life of Gideon Welles and the relationship he would hold with President Lincoln.  Gideon Welles pretty much set up the "modern" United States Navy.  You will research the man and the politics he encountered when managing the Union Navy successfully.

PART EIGHT: THE BLOCKADE OF CONFEDERATE PORTS

General Scott had his Anaconda Plan.  What finally happened was a huge blockade of our Atlantic and Gulf ports, and as time went along the winning back of the Mississippi River.  This activity covers the men and ships involved in the Blockade.  Read the proclamation from President Lincoln declaring the blockade.  Read about General Winfield Scott's Anaconda Plan, and read about ships, blockade actions, and "prizes" won during the blockade.  How did the Blockade effect the Confederate war effort and the Southern people? Present your gathered information in a computer program or in a poster. 

PART NINE: REAR ADMIRAL JOHN DAHLGREN & HIS CANNONS

Both sides of the Civil War needed new armaments and cannons, that could better destroy the opposing side.  Siege cannons, rifles, smoothbores, and mortars were needed for inland, ocean and river battles.  John Dahlgren would invent his Dahlgren cannon.  This part will cover the old style armament and John Dahlgren invention.  You will see how the Dahlgren worked beautifully with the new ironclad gunboats. 

PART TEN:  ERICCSON, BROOKE AND PORTER DESIGN THE FIRST IRONCLAD GUNBOATS

The Industrial Revolution had come "full steam," by 1862.  The Union Navy was composed of wooden ships of old.  The Confederate states had no Navy.  Research and prototypes of Ironclads were constructed in Europe.  The Confederacy had taken Gosport Naval Yards and the USS Merrimack was sunk by the retreating Union Navy.  The ship would be raised and reconstructed as an ironclad.  Great fear was all over the north over this monster.  President Lincoln and Secretary Welles set up an Ironclad Committee.  Congress passed legislation to have an ironclad ship built.  The rest is history, based upon a design and small model made by John Ericcson.  Read the information provided on the pages and design your own presentation on the building of the Merrimack and the Monitor.

PART ELEVEN:  SAILORS RECRUITMENT PLAN- NORTH AND SOUTH

At the start of the war President Lincoln asked for 75,000 volunteers.  The Navy recruited and men had to pass a few standards.  The Confederate Navy had similar standards.  Read about the recruitment for both sides.  African Americans could serve in both Navies, and did.  The United States Navy did not discriminate and sailors got along, not thinking about racial things.  You are to read the articles online and then answer questions or conduct research to gather facts.  Presentations or posters would be good to report your results.

PART TWELVE:  MEDICAL CARE OF SAILORS AND SOLDIERS/ THE NAVY HOSPITAL SHIPS

The Civil War was the first "modern war," and the medical care and hospital ships were started and enlarged quickly as the war started, throughout it.  In this part, you will read about the medical corps, the nursing corps, the hospital ships (USS Red Rover, in particular).  In addition, you will read about the conditions and dangers of being on an ironclad type ship. 

 

Follow the links to get questions for each of the Parts:

PART ONE

U.S. Navy before the Civil War, Sail Ships and Steamers

  PART TWO

The Ironclad Gunboats

  PART THREE

The U.S. Navy Civil War Racial "Melting Pot"

  PART FOUR

Civil War Inventions, "Firsts"

 

             
PART FIVE

Blockade "Prizes"

 

  PART SIX

The Great Sea and River Battles & the Men Involved

  PART SEVEN

Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles

 

   

PART EIGHT

The Union Blockade Plan for Rivers and Coastal Ports

 

 
             
PART NINE

Civil War Armaments and the Dahlgren Cannon

 

  PART TEN

The Pook Turtle and the Inventors of the American Ironclad Gunboat

  PART ELEVEN

Recruitment of Naval Personnel: Requirements and Numbers

 

  PART TWELVE

Hospital Ships of the Sanitary Commission

 

 

IRONCLADS ANSWER FORM

 
RESOURCES ON GUNBOATS AND IRONCLADS
Port Columbus National Civil War Naval Museum
GUNBOATS HELP WIN BATTLES The U.S.S. Monitor Center from the Mariner's Museum

 

Vicksburg National Military Park Ft. Donelson National Battlefield Activity Home Page for Ironclads
Return to the Ironclads Resource Home Page

Return to Learning On-Line Home Page