Learning Lincoln On-line

FROM-- SET SIX, CIVIL WAR STUDIES

Topic One-hundred-one: Lincoln's House Divided Speech and the Issues of the Time  & Topic Fourteen:  The Lincoln Home Parlor Springfield, Illinois Puzzle

A House Divided and Expansion of Slavery

Major Parties and Presidential Elections of the 1860's

Southern Democrat Party

Their Platfor & History

John Breckinridge: Presidential candidate in 1860 (lost)

Northern Democrat Party

Their Platform

Stephen Douglas: Presidential candidate 1860, lost to Abraham Lincoln

 

 

American Party

(Know Nothing Party)

Their Platform & History

Constitutional Union Party, Election of 1860)

Their Platform

John Bell: 1860 Presidential candidate (lost)

 

 

 

 

Republican Party

Their Platform & History

Abraham Lincoln:  President 1860-1865 (was assassinated April 13, 1865)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content of this activity is derived from the Lincoln Home National Memorial Web site by the National Park Service

“This is a world of compensations; and he who would be no slave, must consent to have no slave. Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves and under a just God, can not long retain it.” Abraham Lincoln 4/6/1859

This Thomas Nast image, courtesy of The Library of Congress, celebrates the emancipation of slaves at the end of the Civil War.

 

    "Abraham Lincoln is often referred to as "The Great Emancipator" and yet, he did not publicly call for emancipation throughout his entire life. Lincoln began his public career by claiming that he was "antislavery" -- against slavery's expansion but not calling for immediate emancipation.  He was not an active "Abolitionist."  However, the man who began as "antislavery" eventually issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed all slaves in those states that were in rebellion. He vigorously supported the 13th Amendment which abolished slavery throughout the United States, and, in the last speech of his life, he recommended extending the vote to African Americans." 

 

Visit the Henry Ford video covering America's history of liberty:  https://www.thehenryford.org/explore/inside/liberty-and-justice-for-all/

Using actual words (spoken and written) of Abraham Lincoln, we can find out how he stood as President on the issue of slavery.  A Civil War was ongoing because of this issue.

These words of Lincoln are listed on the Lincoln Home National Memorial Web site . This activity will use these quotes as our main resource
 

1st Speech against slavery  1837, age 28

 

Lincoln expresses his hatred of slavery, 1855

 

The right to enslave another?  1854

 

America the hypocrite?  Solutions for Negroes? 1854

 

Lincoln repeats his hatred of slavery 1858

 

Slave/Master ambitions 1858

 

"All men are created
equal" applied to African Americans  1858

 

Half slave and half free 1858

 

"All men are created equal" for all 1858

 

Battle of individual rights, or divine rights of kings, 1858

 

Social equality not likely, 1858

 

"Resisting it as a wrong, treating it as a wrong," 1859

 

"I think Slavery is wrong, morally, and politically" 1859

 

"Free labor has the inspiration of hope; pure slavery has no hope" 1859

 

". . . I am inflexible" 1861

 

The vote for colored man. . ."on the very intelligent, and on those who serveour cause as soldiers." 1865  

In the selected readings above from Abraham Lincoln throughout his career, you can see a change in his attitude and feelings about slavery/equality/individual rights.  It is hard to understand how the 1850's political leader, even Abraham Lincoln, could think the way they did.  America was in a totally different value system in the mid 19th Century.  Slavery was a very important economic issue in the South, especially after development of the Cotton Gin.  The slave was basically treated as an investment, tool, and work-horse as such.  The Southern politicians were staunch about protecting the right of owning slaves.

Take on the role of a U.S. President, a Southern plantation owner/farmer with slaves, a northerner, a poor white farmer in the north and border states, and make decisions where you stand on the subject of SLAVERY or ABOLITIONIST.  Also, you will have to decide on the issue of expansion of slavery into the new Territories, later to be states.

It is difficult now to understand why slavery was ever allowed in the United States.  Why did it grow and become so important in the South?  Why did some Northerners fear the ending of slavery in the South?  What did President Lincoln do about slavery?      
Check the new PBS Slavery & the Making of America for timelines, and lots of information

Complete my Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858 Activity and Resource Site
to learn more about Abraham Lincoln's Pre-Civil War views on slavery.
 

1850's-1860's Individual or Group concerned with Slavery (Pro or Con) Why slavery should continue? Why slavery should end?
"A Slave" in the South, or in a Northern State  with fear of being returned
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Anti Slave Activist (Abolitionist)
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Poor white farmer in the Northern/border states

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Southern Plantation owner/farmer
 

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U.S. President
 

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"You" as one of the above .groups, or even the President.
Take on a role as one of the above and answer the questions in the boxes
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16th President Topics Index

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