Learning Lincoln On-line

FROM-- SET TWO, CIVIL WAR STUDIES

Topics Forty-Eight & Fifty:  President Lincoln's Command

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Lincoln's Cabinet Lincoln's "Higher Moral Ground" Holding the Union Together The Slavery Issue
Lincoln, the War and Congressional Oversight Mr. Lincoln's Generals (Finding a Fighting General) Lincoln Learning and Becoming Commander & Chief Lincoln's Political Leadership (the Issues) Post-War Reconstruction Planning Library of Congress Timeline

PRESIDENT LINCOLN'S THINKING AS DISPLAYED THROUGH WRITTEN LETTERS

DIRECTIONS:

1.  Before starting the questions for  this Primary Source exercise, read about these two men:

General George McClellan-- What army was he a general of , and find out why he is considered a great general?

General JEB Stuart-- What army was he a general of, and find out why he is considered a great general?


2.  Go to the Library of Congress Link and read the telegraph message (Click message number 12 (May 25, 1862) to and from General George McClellan to President Lincoln).   Answer these questions in short paragraph form.  

a.  What did McClellan tell the President that his intention was concerning attacking Richmond?

b.  What did the General think the main objective of Confederate forces was?

c.  How did the General describe his sources of information about Confederate movements?

d.  When did the General say he would finally attack Richmond?


3.  Go to the Library of Congress Link and read the telegraph message (Click message number 20 October 26, 1862) Answer these questions in short paragraph form.  

a.  Why did the President mention Stuart's Cavalry "out-marched ours?"

b.  What do you think he meant by "having done more marked service?"

c.  Did the President think that McClellan should make a movement of his army? 

d.  What could that do to help the cavalry? 

e.  What did the President rejoice about?


4.  Go back to message number 20 October 26, 1862, and read the bottom notation about this message.  Answer these questions:

a.  What did Lincoln say and think about McClellan's troops' horses being fatigued? 

b.  What did he mean by his comment to McClellan, "...What have your horses done since (the battle of) Antietam?"

c.  How did President Lincoln get along with General McClellan, and what was the reason for this relationship? 

d.  What happened to Gen. McClellan , and later in 1864, what would the General do to the President?  Google the general to find out what happened to the general.


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