Learning Lincoln On-line

 

FROM-- SET SEVEN, CIVIL WAR STUDIES

(Topic Forty-three:  Frederick Douglass, Abolitionist and Advisor to the President)

HOME PAGE & PARTS

HOME PAGE DETAILED PROJECT DESCRIPTION  DETAILED PROJECT DESCRIPTION   LINCOLN & ABOLITIONIST DRAMA ACT. PART ONE--NORTHERN STAR PUZZLE TASKS PART THREE--CIVIL WAR BLACK AMERICAN PUZZLE FREDERICK DOUGLASS PICTURE PUZZLE PART FIVE-- PUZZLE ANSWER FORM
ARTICLE ONE ARTICLE TWO ARTICLE THREE ARTICLE FOUR ARTICLE FIVE ARTICLE SIX ARTICLE SEVEN ARTICLE EIGHT ARTICLE NINE ARTICLE TEN

http://www.alincolnlearning.us/douglass2.jpg

Frederick Douglass

1818-1895
Slave, Free Man, Abolitionist/Newspaper Editor

 

http://www.alincolnlearning.us/douglass1.jpg

 

CLICK A LINK TO ENTER SPECIFIC ACTIVITY DIRECTIONS AND TASKS

 

PART ONE  THE NORTHERN STAR HOME PAGE

 

PART TWO (ADVANCED) FOR READING AND RESEARCH/FACT GATHERING

 

PART THREE  CIVIL WAR PICTURE PUZZLE FOR QUESTIONS

AND ANSWERS

 

PART FOUR THE FREDERICK DOUGLASS TASKS PICTURE

PUZZLE

 

PART FIVE THE PICTURE PUZZLE ANSWER FORM

Introduction
 

       In this learning activity, the student will learn how, even in the worst of events, you can take "three big lessons" from Frederick Douglass and be successful.  To study the life and career of Frederick is one of the most uplifting learning experiences.  Frederick Douglass had great respect from several Presidents, and was most instrumental in getting the Black American men into the Civil War as full-fledged soldiers.  The Emancipation Proclamation was also a result of counseling by Douglass to President Lincoln.  Here are the three lessons of this activity.  The student will research Frederick Douglass' life, and then apply these concepts to some personal activities. 

       Frederick Douglass was a great American that, much like Abraham Lincoln, arose from the humblest of environment to achieve firsts for an African-American in very hard times.  He would start his life not even knowing when he was born.  His masters did not encourage or allow their slave children to learn their birth date.  He was a gifted child that always wanted to know about his roots and ancestors, and especially his date of birth, but never could find out.  When he wrote his first autobiography, he made a statement that he was about 27 years of age.

       He would devise plans of escape, at a very young age.  He would escape at a young age.  Frederick was taught to read and write by a white person when young, and he took full advantage of these skills the rest of his life.  As we will consider in this multi-faceted learning activity the "Three Learnings," he would speak on, these can be used in the learning of Frederick Douglass and the events of his life.  With Abraham Lincoln the themes to consider are honesty and "learning by the light of the fire."  In this learning activity the two famous men and acquaintances' will be compared and contrasted.

       In this activity, the early life (pre-1860), the later life (post 1865) will be covered in a later sections.  The primary Douglass life considerations will be the period of time from 1860-1865.  This activity could be covered chronologically in-order, if time will allow such a study.  Frederick Douglass' role in helping the Northern  war effort, and final win.  


Frederick Douglass Learning's

         Believe in yourself.

         Take advantage of every opportunity

         Use the power of spoken and written language to effect positive change for yourself and society

 

--Frederick Douglass said, "What is possible for me is possible for you." He used these keys and by making them his own, he created a life of honor, respect and success that he could never have dreamed of when still a boy on Colonel Lloyd's plantation on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.
--On January 1, 1836, Douglass made a resolution that he would be free by the end of the year. He planned an escape. But early in April he was jailed after his plan was discovered. By September of 1838, he was free and moved to Massachusetts to be with his new bride and enjoy his new freedom.  This was the ultimate goal of life to be reached.  He would not stop there. 


--THIS ACTIVITY WILL CENTER ON DOUGLASS'S WORK DURING THE PERIOD OF 1860-1865. 

--A brief study of his life will help for understanding his Three Learnings. 

--The activity will provide experiences for intermediate grade level (4-6), middle grades (7-8) and high school (9-12)

LEARNING ACTIVITY HIGHLIGHTS AND TOPICS

 

http://www.alincolnlearning.us/fdouglass1.gif

Portrait of Frederick Douglass

 

 

 

 

 

NORTH STAR ABOLITIONIST

 NEWSPAPER

http://www.alincolnlearning.us/north_star_1847.jpg

A caption view of Douglass' first

 national newspaper

 

 

http://www.alincolnlearning.us/douglasshouse.gif

Frederick Douglass House

 

 

http://www.alincolnlearning.us/douglassoffice.gif

Frederick Douglass

Newspaper Office

 


Frederick Douglass Autobiographies are available on-line from the Library of Congress, Frederick Douglass Papers: In His Own Words Including:


FREDERICK DOUGLASS VISITS THE WHITEHOUSE AFRICAN-AMERICAN TROOP CONDITIONS TO HELP IMPROVE CONDITIONS FOR BLACK SOLDIERS

  • Frederick Douglass Effect on the winning of the Civil War
  • 54th Massachusetts Fight Heroically
  • Frederick Douglass-- "station master" of the Rochester terminus of the Underground Railroad, writer, publisher, orator, Army recruiter for black troops, and advisor to the President
  • Frederick Douglass' Three Life Learning’s

BIOGRAPHICAL TIMELINE FOR THE YEARS 1860-1865

Frederick Douglass Timeline  Visit the timeline on the Library of Congress

from the American Memories Collection:  Frederick Douglass Papers Online Collection

Images from the Monroe County (NewYork) Library System Digital Collection

1860. Returns to the United States upon hearing of the death of his wife, Annie. Her death had the effect of curtailing Douglass' European speaking tours.

1861. Calls for the use of Black troops to fight the Confederacy through the establishment of Negro regiments in the Union Army.

1863a. Congress authorized black enlistment in the Union army. The Massachusetts 54th Regiment was the first black unit to be formed and the governor of the state asked Frederick Douglass to help in the recruitment. Douglass agreed and wrote an editorial that was published in the local newspapers. "Men of Color, to Arms," he urged blacks to "end in a day the bondage of centuries" and to earn their equality and show their patriotism by fighting in the Union cause. His sons Lewis and Charles were among the first Rochester African Americans to enlist. Douglass visited President Abraham Lincoln to protest discrimination against Black troops.

1863b. Douglass visits President Lincoln, protests discrimination against black troops; visits President Lincoln in White House to plead the case of the Negro soldiers discriminated against in the Union army; receives assurance from Lincoln that problem will be given every consideration; visits secretary of War Stanton and assured that he will receive a commission in Union Army to Recruit Negro soldiers in South.

1864. Frederick Douglass served as an adviser to President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War and fought for the adoption of constitutional amendments that guaranteed voting rights and other civil liberties for blacks. Douglass provided a powerful voice for human rights during this period of American history and is still revered today for his contributions against racial injustice.

1865. Douglass speaks at memorial meeting on life and death of Lincoln called by Negroes of New York City after New York Common Council refused to permit Negroes to participate in the funeral procession when Lincoln's body passed through the city. Later Mrs. Lincoln sends him the martyred president's walking stick.


LEARNING ON-LINE RESOURCES

Frederick Douglass Articles for Reading

Abraham Lincoln Classroom

Documents of the South

Frederick Douglass Picture Puzzle

Frederick Douglass, Self-Made Man

Learning On-Line "Slavery in the South" Home Page

Learning On-Line Home Page