Learning Lincoln On-line

FROM-- SET SEVEN, CIVIL WAR STUDIES

Topic Forty-three:  Black Americans during the Civil War Picture Puzzle

HOME PAGE DETAILED PROJECT DESCRIPTION  DETAILED PROJECT DESCRIPTION   LINCOLN & ABOLITIONIST DRAMA ACT. PART ONE--NORTHERN STAR PUZZLE TASKS PART THREE--CIVIL WAR BLACK AMERICAN PUZZLE FREDERICK DOUGLASS PICTURE PUZZLE PART FIVE-- PUZZLE ANSWER FORM
ARTICLE ONE ARTICLE TWO ARTICLE THREE ARTICLE FOUR ARTICLE FIVE ARTICLE SIX ARTICLE SEVEN ARTICLE EIGHT ARTICLE NINE ARTICLE TEN

 

ARTICLE #7  ABRAHAM LINCOLN RESPONDS TO STEPHEN DOUGLAS IN THE

CHARLESTON DEBATE, 1858

       The entire text of the debate can be read at the Mr. Lincoln & Friends site, by the Lehrman Institute

       Judge Douglas has said to you that he has not been able to get from me an answer to the question whether I am in favor of negro-citizenship. So far as I know, the Judge never asked me the question before. [Applause.] He shall have no occasion to ever ask it again, for I tell him very frankly that I am not in favor of negro citizenship. [Renewed applause.] This furnishes me an occasion for saying a few words upon the subject. I mentioned in a certain speech of mine which has been printed, that the Supreme Court had decided that a negro could not possibly be made a citizen, and without saying what was my ground of complaint in regard to that, or whether I had any ground of complaint, Judge Douglas has from that thing manufactured nearly every thing that he ever says about my disposition to produce an equality between the negroes and the white people. [Laughter and applause.] If any one will read my speech, he will find I mentioned that as one of the points decided in the course of the Supreme Court opinions, but I did not state what objection I had to it. But Judge Douglas tells the people what my objection was when I did not tell them myself. Loud applause and laughter.] Now my opinion is that the different States have the power to make a negro a citizen under the Constitution of the United States if they choose. The Dred Scott decision decides that they have not that power. If the State of Illinois had the power I should be opposed to the exercise of it. [Cries of 'good,' 'good,' and applause.] That is all I have to say about it.

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