Learning Lincoln On-line

FROM-- SET TWO, CIVIL WAR STUDIES

Topic Thirty-one:  Lincoln's Battlefield Leadership

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Lincoln and the Battlefield Command
Using Civil War On-Line Historical Timelines

                    

The President conferring with General McClellan (left) and other officers (right) at Antietam

 

In order to study Lincoln & His Command, one must see the order of events.   Use of a good timeline helps when conducting any study of the Civil War. 

Abraham
Executive Order - President's Special War Order No. 3
March 11, 1862
 
Major-General McClellan having personally taken the field at the head of the Army of the Potomac, until otherwise ordered he is relieved from the command of the other military departments, he retaining command of the Department of the Potomac.

Ordered further, That the departments now under the respective commands of Generals Halleck and Hunter, together with so much of that under General Buell as lies west of a north and south line indefinitely drawn through Knoxville, Tenn., be consolidated and designated the Department of the Mississippi, and that until otherwise ordered Major-General Halleck have command of said department.

Ordered also, That the country west of the Department of the Potomac and east of the Department of the Mississippi be a military department, to be called the Mountain Department, and that the same be commanded by Major-General Fremont.

That all the commanders of departments, after the receipt of this order by them, respectively report severally and directly to the Secretary of War, and that prompt, full, and frequent reports will be expected of all and each of them.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN



GENERAL IN CHIEF

MARCH 11

From History.com at http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/lincoln-shuffles-the-union-command

On this day in 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issues War Order No. 3, a measure making several changes at the top of the Union Army command structure. Lincoln created three departments, placing Henry Halleck in charge of the West, John C. Fremont in command of troops in the Appalachian region, and George McClellan in charge in the East.

The most significant change in the order removed McClellan from his post as general-in-chief of all Union armies, though he retained command of the Army of the Potomac, the most important Union force. McClellan had assumed leadership of that army after it was defeated at the First Battle of Bull Run, Virginia, in July 1861. He quickly installed an efficient command structure and began training an effective fighting force. Three months later, Lincoln elevated McClellan to general-in-chief. However, the relationship between the president and his commanding officer was strained and sometimes contentious. The arrogant McClellan was contemptuous of the president and often ignored Lincoln's communications or kept information from him.

McClellan was stretched thin as general-in-chief, and even he recognized this fact. He was bothered by the March 1862 demotion, but wrote to Lincoln that he would "work just as cheerfully as ever before, and... no consideration of self will in any manner interfere with the discharge of my public duties." For McClellan, this was a rare show of grace and deference towards Lincoln. The move allowed McClellan to spend more time planning his upcoming campaign against the Confederate capital at Richmond, Virginia.

For a time, there was no general-in-chief, and the three regional commanders reported to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. The post did not stay empty for long, though, as Halleck was elevated to general-in-chief five months later.

Georgia's Blue and Gray Trail Timeline of "Generals-in-Chief."

 Generals Henry Halleck and Ulysses S. Grant would serve as General Chief in the final years of the Civil War.


A WINNING GENERAL

President Lincoln's Telegram to General U.S. Grant, August 17, 1864, the National Archives

"Hold on with a bulldog grip, and chew and choke as much as possible," sets the course that would bring an end to the four year war.  President Lincoln's Instruction to General Grant on winning the War. 

See the actual transcribed President Lincoln's Telegram to General U.S. Grant, August 17, 1864, on the National Archives Resource Site.


Read about the time before U.S. Grant as General-in-Chief

RESOURCES:

Use the Timeline Resource that works best for you.  Look them over first.

American Civil Battlefield Protection Site

Smithsonian civil War Timeline

Library of Congress Civil War Timeline

Wiki.net Civl War Timeline

History Place Timeline

DIRECTIONS:  In this Activity you are to look over the Highlights of each year of the Civil War.  Complete the table sections

CIVIL WAR TIMELINE YEARS
GREAT BATTLES,  GENERALS IN CHARGE  Which side won? LINCOLN'S ACTION TO HELP WIN THE WAR 
1861 The War Starts    

 

Land: Military Decisions:
     
     
  Sea & Waterways: Political Decisions:
     
     
1862  Year of Retreat & Failure  Land: Military Decisions:
. . .
. . .
. Sea & Waterways: Political Decisions:
.. . .
.. . .
1863  Gettysburg, Emancipation, The Draft   Land: Military Decisions:
.. . .
. . .
. Sea & Waterways: Political Decisions:
.. .. ..
.. .. ..
1864 U.S. Grant commands Union Army  Land: Military Decisions:
. . .
.    
.. Sea & Waterways: Political Decisions:
     
. . .
1865  War ends, Lee surrenders Land: Military Decisions:
... . .
. . .
. Sea & Waterways: Political Decisions:
. . .
. .  
 
MORE ABOUT CIVIL WAR battles & GENERALS:

Civil War Generals and Admirals Stamp Puzzle Page

Civil War Brevet Officers Home Page

Battle Field Fact Chart

RESOURCES:

Lincoln Presidential Executive Orders

Library of Congress Civil War Battles and Strategies

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Abraham Lincoln's Classroom

Commander & Chief Page

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